“REJECT KEYSTONE XL PIPELINE MR. PRESIDENT”

350 Central Colorado Presents: A Street Action

“REJECT KEYSTONE XL PIPELINE MR. PRESIDENT”

Tuesday, January 13, at 4:30 PM In front of Centennial Park 410 W. Hwy 50 Salida, CO

We don’t know if you have heard this yet; the Nebraska Supreme Court in a weird decision gave the go ahead for the Keystone XL Pipeline to pass through Nebraska.

So - The decision to stop Keystone forever now rests with President Obama. To give him further encouragement to do the right thing, a decision that will be a major step towards saving the world as we know it, 350 Central Colorado along with most of the other 350 Chapters around the country and most every other concerned and involved organization fighting Climate Change in the United States is mobilizing.

If you can please join us and bring a sign that says something negative about the Keystone XL Pipeline. (We will have extra signs) We’ll be focusing on the afternoon traffic traveling Hwy 50 which will include the skiers returning home.

** We will provide Hot Coffee and Hot Chocolate

Dress warm**

Please bring your biggest smiles and be prepared to wave and laugh and have a great time.

We hope to be finished by 6:30 at the latest.

Our voices will join thousands of others across the country. Whether we are a few or we are the 400,000 of the Peoples Climate March, together we will be heard. Images and video of our Action will be sent to the White House. See you there,

Your 350 Central Colorado Team

If you can, please RSVP to Kay and Bob Parker

robertkayparker@gmail.com

Ph. 942-4389

Comments

    There may be other comments on this topic on our Facebook page.

  • I like the pipeline, but for water. Canada has one fifth of the world's fresh water. We're going to have tap that sooner or later.

  • Absolutely, stop the pipeline. We don't desperately need all the jobs this would bring, it'd surely help derail the welfare state status our government wishes for us, not to mention the cheap oil actually getting to the refineries, or the coast where it could be sold. Me, I loved it when we had $5.00 a gallon gas..

    What I fail to see is how this could possibly directly contribute to the perceived climate change issue. It would however contribute to the USA regaining it's independence from foreign oil, and I'm guessing you see that as a bad thing ?

  • The talk of "not being able to get off oil quickly enough to shift our economy to alternative energy" is a PR line from big oil. They have done extensive focus groups to determine that this is something people will embrace.

    Ten years ago the idea of changing the economy through alternative energies was less realistic than it is today. A friend of mine has a solar powered house, it charges his electric car. Other people, with off grid houses use their electric cars to power their homes. This is not sci-fi, this is today. People in rural America can put this technology in your hands today. The costs for manufacturing and installation of alternative energy solutions has dropped through the floor in the last three years.

    It's time to show the world what America is all about. We are innovators and individuals who refuse to listen to Representatives (Dems and Republicans) who are in the back pockets of a dying industry in their last gasps to remain relevant. These mega corps make billions betting that you believe oil is actually needed.

    Sure, there may always be a place for oil in manufacturing, and in the short term, for commercial trucking. But, a NEW oil pipeline? Really? In 2015? I sincerely love climbing up into my big ass plow truck, and revving that V8. but the electric engine in my new car is fast as hell and silent. It's a hot rod—and the new motorcycles are even crazier.

    Things are changing, fast.

  • If the pipeline is supposed to be an infrastructure project that creates jobs it is a weak one. There are better infrastructure projects that would create more jobs and be more beneficial to more people. Look at all the bridges that need to be rebuilt right here in Colorado. Those are the kind of infrastructure projects i would support.

    If it is supposed to bring down gas prices, why is the target for final use of the refined products overseas?

    I don't understand the rational behind the US government forcing american farmers to give up their property rights to a for profit Canadian company? Can someone explain that one to me?

    Lastly, I am not sure I am against the project overall. I think without the pipeline they will still strip mine the tar sands for oil and then ship it by rail which is far more dangerous.

    Interestingly last year the oil and gas industry created 16000new jobs during a boom year. Solar companies in th eUS created 36000 new jobs.

  • The economic benefits from America’s oil and natural gas industry are vast and undeniable, in 2011 the industry supported more than 9.8 million jobs, 600,000 more jobs than it supported just two years earlier. Oil and natural gas industry operations supported 8.4 million full- and part-time jobs nationally, while its capital investment supported another 1.4 million jobs. These jobs generated $597.6 billion in associated labor income — including wages, salaries, benefits and proprietors' income, and contributed $1.2 trillion in added value in the economy.

    The figure of 16,000 new jobs you quote seems to be, from what I could find, the requirements that Canada will have for the oil sands workforce in the coming year. Almost overnight, Keystone XL could put 9,000 American men and women directly to work. The U.S. State Department’s Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement found that the project would support more than 42,000 direct and indirect jobs nationwide.

    In a perfect world, alternative energies are a laudable goal, that being said, it's an expensive alternative at best, and there's little impact on the oil and oil by products such as Natural Gas required by industry to make for example, plastics, tires, day to day lubricants such as the legendary WD40, and Duct tape. Oil, and oil by products are so ingrained in our daily lives, that the arguments for curtailing production are pretty much empty ones. Once it's out of the ground, it has to be transported. The alternative to the pipeline, as you point out is ground transportation, such as rail cars and trucks.

    Not only is this dangerous, it's also inefficient and thus, costly. It was interesting to research your numbers on the solar sector adding jobs, given that a scant 2 years ago, many of the highly subsidized "green" US companies were failing at an alarming rate, the reasons cited at the time were the availability of cheap Chinese products. Makes a body wonder why all of the sudden there's a boom in that sector..

    My 2¢, your mileage may vary

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